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NEWS & FEATURES

 

Seven Signs That You Are Being Lied To

LINDA PRESTON

Would you know if someone was lying to you? Most of us like to think we would but every once in awhile we have to admit to ourselves that someone has pulled the wool over our eyes.

Private US Group Plans Mars Fly-by
in 2018

Plans are underway for the first manned mission to Mars -- just five years from now. The privately financed fly-by in 2018 would take a man and a woman -- both Americans -- on a modified existing U.S. spacecraft to within 160 kilometers of the surface of the Red Planet, and return them safely to Earth.

Spanish Is Not Only a Language ...

Spanish is not only a language, it is the heart of a culture, religion and history, and a communication tool shared by nearly 500 million people in 21 countries.

Mahjong Mysteries - Ancient Athena on Nintendo 3DS™ eShop Released

cerasus.media launched Mahjong Mysteries – Ancient Athena on Nintendo’s eShop service. Accompany the famous adventurer David on his most mysterious mission yet - the one that will change everything!

AC/DC Now on iTunes

Complete Catalog Available Digitally for the First Time; All Tracks Mastered for iTunes

Columbia Records and Apple® announced that AC/DC’s entire catalog is now available digitally for the first time exclusively on the iTunes Store® worldwide (www.itunes.com). From their 1976 debut High Voltage to seminal classic Back In Black and 2008 smash hit Black Ice, every one of AC/DC’s 16 studio albums, along with four live albums and three compilation albums, are available for the first time ever on the iTunes Store.

TV and the Internet: A Marriage
Made in Entertainment Heaven

If you have bought a new television lately, the chances are it is a lot smarter than your old one. Smart TVs, also known as connected or hybrid televisions, featuring integrated internet connectivity, currently account for around a third of TV sales in Europe. They are the end point in a huge and rapidly expanding value chain driven by the intensifying convergence of television and the internet.

 



News Sign

A Growing Share of Latinos Get Their News in English

MARK HUGO LOPEZ and ANA GONZALEZ-BECERRA
Pew Hispanic Center

I. OVERVIEW

The language of news media consumption is changing for Hispanics: a growing share of Latino adults are consuming news in English from television, print, radio and internet outlets, and a declining share are doing so in Spanish, according to survey findings from the Pew Research Center.

In 2012, 82% of Hispanic adults said they got at least some of their news in English,1 up from 78% who said the same in 2006. By contrast, the share who get at least some of their news in Spanish has declined, to 68% in 2012 from 78% in 2006.2

Half (50%) of Latino adults say they get their news in both languages, down from 57% in 2010.

The rise in use of English news sources has been driven by an increase in the share of Hispanics who say they get their news exclusively in English. According to the survey, one-third (32%) of Hispanic adults in 2012 did this, up from 22% in 2006. By contrast, the share of Hispanic adults who get their news exclusively in Spanish has decreased to 18% in 2012 from 22% in 2006.

These changes in news consumption patterns reflect several ongoing demographic trends within the Hispanic community. For example:

* A growing share of Latino adults speak English well. Today 59% of Latino adults speak English proficiently, up from 54% in 2006 and 2000, according to U.S. Census Bureau data.

* Slowing immigration. As migration to the U.S. has slowed (Passel, Cohn and Gonzalez-Barrera, 2012), the share of Hispanic adults who are foreign born has declined. Today about 51% of Hispanic adults were born in another country, down from 55% in 2006 and 54% in 2000, according to U.S. Census Bureau data.

* Growing time in the U.S. With the slowdown in migration, the average number of years lived in the U.S. among Latino adult immigrants has grown, from 16 years in 2000 and 17 years in 2006 to 20 years in 2011.

• U.S.-born Latino adults on the rise. Annually about 800,000 young U.S.-born Latinos enter adulthood (Taylor, Gonzalez-Barrera, Passel and Lopez, 2012). Many are the children of immigrants, and a significant share are third or higher generation. These groups are much more English proficient than are immigrants.

Even though the share of Hispanic adults who consume news media in Spanish has declined, the number of potential Spanish news media consumers is growing as a result of the rapid overall rise in the number of Hispanics in the U.S.—to 52 million in 2011, up from 35 million in 2000. According to U.S. Census Bureau data, a record 35 million Hispanics ages 5 and older speak Spanish (at home), up from 25 million in 2000 and 10 million in 1980. At the same time, a record 31 million Hispanics ages 5 and older are proficient in English, up from 19 million in 2000 and 8 million in 1980.3

This report is largely based on a nationally representative bilingual telephone survey of 1,765 Latino adults conducted from September 7 to October 4, 2012. The margin of error for the full sample is plus or minus 3.2 percentage points at the 95% confidence level. For a full description of the survey methodology, see Appendix B.

Among the report’s other findings:

Keeping up with the news

* About eight-in-ten Hispanic adults say they keep up with the news “a lot” (45%) or “some” (36%) and about two-in-ten keep up “not much” (15%) or “not at all” (4%).

* Among Hispanics who get their news exclusively in English, 53% say they keep up with the news a lot. Among those who get their news in both English and Spanish, 46% say they do the same. By contrast, 35% of Hispanics who get their news exclusively from Spanish-language news platforms say they keep up with the news a lot.

* Keeping up with the news is also correlated with educational attainment. Six-in-ten (58%) Hispanics who have at least some college experience say they keep up with the news a lot. Among those with a high school diploma, 44% say the same. And among those with less than a high school diploma, one-third (34%) say they keep up with the news a lot.

Television is the most popular platform for news,
but internet is on the rise

* Fully 86% of Latino adults say that on a typical weekday they get their news from television. That is down slightly from 92% who said the same in 2006 but is higher than the share of Latinos who get their news from radio (56%), the internet (56%) or print newspapers (42%).

* Use of internet news media has grown among Latino adults. Today more than half (56%) say they consume news media on a typical weekday from the internet, up from 37% in 2006.
Radio news media and print newspapers have seen the biggest declines in use among Latino adults. Use of radio is down from 64% in 2006 to 56% in 2012. Use of print newspapers is down even more sharply, from 58% in 2006 to 42% in 2012.

Most Latinos use two or three news media platforms
on a typical weekday

* Latino adults on average use 2.4 news media platforms among the four tested—television, print newspapers, radio and the internet—when they consume news media.

* Looked at another way, 3% of Latino adults do not use any of the four news media platforms tested, 17% use one, 32% use two, 33% use three and 15% use all four platforms.

* Six-in-ten (58%) Latinos who consume news media in both English and Spanish use three or four news media platforms. Among Latinos who consume news media only in English, 51% do the same. However, among Latinos who consume news media only in Spanish, just 23% do this.

News reports from both Spanish- and English-language news organizations seen as “accurate”

* When asked if news organizations get their facts straight or are often inaccurate, 60% of all Hispanics says Spanish-language news organizations “get the facts straight” and 59% say the same of English-language news organizations.

* Assessments vary by nativity. Two-thirds (65%) of foreign-born Hispanics say Spanish-language news organizations get the facts straight, while 53% of the native born say the same. For English-language news organizations, 64% of the foreign born say they get the facts straight while 54% of the native born say the same.

Spanish-language media seen as doing a better job covering news relevant to Hispanics

* Overall, seven-in-ten Hispanic adults say the Spanish-language news media do an “excellent” (24%) or “good” job (46%) covering news specifically relevant to Hispanics in the U.S. By contrast, about six-in-ten Hispanic adults say the English-language news media do an “excellent” (17%) or “good” job (42%) covering news relevant to Hispanics in the U.S.

* Among Latinos who consume news media only in Spanish or consume news media in both languages, about eight-in-ten (80% and 76% respectively) say the Spanish language news media does an “excellent” or “good” job covering news specifically relevant to Latinos in the U.S. By contrast, among Latinos who get news in English only, fewer (54%) say the same.

More about the report at the Pew Hispanic Center

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